Nice segment today, beat the elements!

Discussion in 'The Daily Grind' started by brick, May 20, 2006.

  1. brick

    brick Answers to "that guy."

    I surprised myself today! I did the road trip to school for Alumni Weekend this afternoon. (And it's clearly very exciting since I'm posting here ;) ) 120 miles, several downpours, and a traffic jam with a result of 41.0mpg door to door. I didn't even bother to key off! This time the strategy was relatively simple: keep the speed around 60mph or lower, lots of load driving, and NICE-on down the hills. I used DWB for the traffic jams and a little ridge riding in the rain, with noticeably easier going than just planting the tires in the water. Nothing fancy, but very effecive! I can't believe more people don't do this.
     
  2. philmcneal

    philmcneal Has it been 10 years? Wow

    doens't the sound of the noise gets to you though? can you be ticketed for RR?
     
  3. Hot Georgia

    Hot Georgia Well-Known Member

    We've had wind storms everyday for the past 3 weeks, most of the time is a head/cross wind.
    Today was especially bad with nearly gail-force head wind.

    Today I got to try a different, unexplored route on the sideroads so I avoided freeway speeds.

    The road had extreme basins and peaks with a few stop signs. I got some FAS too.
    Despite a flashing red stop light 1/4 way up the last hill I still ended up with almost 60MPG.
    If I'd have taken the freeway no doubt I'd be fighting tooth-and-nail for mid 50's over that segment.

    I now have a new favorite road for my afternoon commute into Atlanta. ;)
     
  4. brick

    brick Answers to "that guy."

    No, I think we're talking about two different things. My understanding of ridge riding is that you look for the high points in the lane, which is where you want the tires. This keeps them out of the deep water, at least on one side, reducing rolling resistance.

    But rumble strip riding...now that's something I hadn't thought of before. Remind me not to do that until I'm ready to replace all my tires and suspension parts ;)
     
  5. philmcneal

    philmcneal Has it been 10 years? Wow

    haha yeah because that rumble strip thing on the highway (left of the yellow lane) I think its there because once your car wanders to one side then that rumble will ,"wake you up" to keep your car steady on the road again. What a great invention.


    Hm it sounds crazy but it might just work with the high tire pressure? haha nah i'm kidding.
     
  6. brick

    brick Answers to "that guy."

    That was rough. The return trip made Friday's segment look like a non-stop FAS with my feet on the dashboard. This time traffic was just fine, but the weather was terrible! Easily half of the 125 mile trip was driven in heavy rain that completely soaked the roads. Speeds and technique were about the same as on Friday. I guess the only thing to say about it is that my 39.5mpg was not great but not really that bad under the circumstances. The tank is sitting at 37.8mpg on the scangauge after 1/3 city driving, 2/3 highway driving over ~350 mi. Back to the grind tomorrow...
     
  7. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Brick:

    ___What a wonderful change I have seen in both your driving technique(s) and your results! You should be very proud as am I in regards to what you achieved in such a short span of time given the circumstances. I want to personally thank you for sticking it out and not giving up when the weather did not cooperate for that return trip. There is nothing more trying then battling the elements for every drop of fuel and you persevered!

    ___I should create a “Hypermiler of the Week” thread because your story and results most certainly places you near or at the top of the list for the week ending May, 21, 2006.

    “Brick took on the North East’s worst and rose to the top with a best tank matching segment of 39.5 mpg”.

    ___Good Luck and congrats!

    ___Wayne
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2006
  8. brick

    brick Answers to "that guy."

    I really appreciate the kind words, Wayne! No lie, about 40 miles in I had thoughts of accelerating just to get the drive overwith. But I had to reconcile the fact that I wouldn't get home noticeably faster, and I would probably end up wasting nearly a gallon of fuel in the process.

    What really makes this route tough is the fact that both ends are 200-300ft above sea level, but the center of the route is well over 1700ft. (There's actually a sign up there stating that the next highest point on I-90 is somewhere like Nebraska.) Heading east-bound, this makes for an extremely long, slow, unsteady climb that begins just east of the NY/MA border. You can load drive the hills on your way up but that will only do so much. It's one of those sections where you gain 200 feet, gradually lose 50-100, gain 200 more, rinse and repeat. Gotta love the Berkshires! Last time I did this in good weather I managed to score 38.5mpg at the top, and today I was at more like 36mpg owing to the rain.

    Then comes the fun part: going down! The Mass Pike keeps on rolling down from the high point and there are a few good opportunities to throw it in neutral and let gravity do its thing. My favorite such section is a six-mile stretch that descends from the Blandford Plaza at 1465ft elevation down to the Westfield River crossing at 300ft. There's one flat spot that requires a short ICE boost, but not until you have sailed quietly down 4 miles of road, gaining speed most of the way. (And right through one of the Pike's most notorious speed traps, I might add). If anything will boost fuel economy, that will! I wasn't brave enough to kill the engine in the rain today but it still did the trick. Thinking back I can't see what harm it would have done. Next time...

    At the end of the day, I must admit that it was fun to get through it and eeke out a tank-building segment. I think I have a better understanding of what you and Dan had to put up with on your Tour de Sol trip. At least in my case there wasn't a score on the line ;)

    It's time to really get on these tanks, I think. The summer driving [insanity] season starts in less than a week!
     

Share This Page