2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Intro and Preview

Discussion in 'In the News' started by xcel, May 25, 2021.

  1. litesong

    litesong litesong

    I agree. Tesla allows owners to change accepting amperage levels. I don’t know about other EV brands. As for the interesting device that couples the amperage from two separate 110V circuits, I’ll NOT get that.
    At this point, there appear to be FREE level 2 chargers within fairly easy range of me. As stated before, Volta has a great idea to supply FREE Level 2 charging…..& make a profit!
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2021
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  2. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Yes, the latest Bolt & Kona fires are showing better battery quality control is needed. I just saw an electronic device on Utube, which can precisely monitor battery pack cell voltage….ON ALL BATTERY CELLS.
    Balancing the battery cells is critical. I’m not an electrician, but wonder why battery cell monitoring & balancing is NOT available to EV owners &/or an automatic function of the battery pack!
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2021
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  3. litesong

    litesong litesong

    From 8-3-2021:
    WriConsult wrote:
    I wasn't aware that there were Level 2 chargers in the 70-80A range
    ////////
    Iitesong wrote:
    Oh…. I just found out that early Tesla Roadster had its own charger connection that modern Teslas don’t fit. Also, I found out that the early Roadster’s had Level 2 chargers that were 70Amps. I wonder if there are enough Roadster chargers to make it worthwhile to get an adapter that would go from the Roadster charger to modern Teslas?
     
  4. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Ahh…..Volta, after some weeks of adding few EV Level 2 chargers, has jumped up their charger count now. They are within two score of 2000 chargers in the US. ALSO, Volta has added their first EV charger in another country. With an increasing number of EV chargers in Washington state, they now have jumped north across the border to Vancouver Island in BC, Canada, north of Victoria!
    Here is another significant bit of data about Volta! JD Power has ranked EV charger companies by dependability. The first two companies ranked are Tesla Superchargers AND….. Volta Level 2 chargers.
     
  5. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Hi Bill…..I just saw a video suggesting that a 110V. NEMA 5-20Amp extension cord drawing 16Amps for extended time periods, could (should?) have a 10 gauge cord! I understand why a 110V. NEMA 5-20Amp cord should be a lot thicker than the normal skinny 110V. NEMA 5-15Amp cord. If & when I get a Tesla Model 3,SR, I could be charging as much as 20hours, while drawing 16Amps. If I got a long extension cord (say 30+feet?), I understand that 10 gauge might be a safe gauge. Do you think if I had a shorter extension cord (say 15feet or less…..which I could use in the garage with the Tesla), might I be safe with a 12 gauge cord for the 110V, NEMA 5-20Amp outlet?
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2021
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  6. BillLin

    BillLin PV solar, geothermal HVAC, hybrids and electrics

    Hi litesong,

    While you can technically use an extension cord with rated current carrying capacity matching the expected load, I think you'll find that most official sources will recommend against using an extension cord when charging an EV. I found articles specific to Teslas charging on extension cords to RV power supply outlets. Seems appropriate for those who bring Teslas to camp sites with RV hook-ups.

    Here's a possibly relevant article. https://www.greencarreports.com/new...cord-to-plug-in-your-car-twitter-poll-results

    Check your local codes. The warnings are even more critical if you're expecting to draw 16A continuously. Don't forget that your house wiring will also be at risk with the possibly long run to your garage. You could run lower gauge wire to the garage if it is a longer distance. I had an electrician wire up a 240V outlet with very low-gauge wire on a 40A circuit just 10 feet from the breaker box in the basement. The 240V 30A EVSE plugs into that outlet. I chose the outlet connection for portability of the EVSE, but hard wiring would have worked for me as well since I don't have any plans to move.
     
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  7. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Oh! The Tesla Mobile Connector that comes standard with Tesla cars is 20 feet long? Would it NOT be considered an extension cord? For home charging from any 125Volt & 240Volt outlet I have, the 20 foot Tesla MC would reach.
    So I think I’m good-to-go. The Nema 5-15amp & J1772 adapters come standard with the MC. Other adapters(NEMA 15-50Amp, NEMA 5-20Amp) were standard, but are extra cost items now. The TT-30 & other adapters would be good purchases too. Tesla has a 5 or 6 adapter set for $240(?) for purchase. Of course, it presently is…..unavailable!
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2021
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  8. BillLin

    BillLin PV solar, geothermal HVAC, hybrids and electrics

    No, not really. :D
     
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  9. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Yes, that is what I thought. So, the Tesla charged at my house without any other “non-Tesla extension cords” would be recommended by Tesla.Only away from my home (at campgrounds, public chargers, other homes, parks?), where “non-Tesla extension cords” might be employed to reach outlets……Tesla would (legally could?) NOT recommend the cords.
    But, there are high quality, proper gauge extension cords of other manufacturers, that can readily & safely be used for Tesla charging?
    /////
    Another subject, bearing on Tesla legalities:
    I think Tesla has removed as standard equipment from the Tesla Mobile Connector pack, the NEMA 15-50-to-Tesla AND 5-20AMP adapters (other adapters?), possibly as a legality. Might that be accurate? Again, there are high quality, proper gauge other manufacturer extension cords of NEMA 15-50-to-Tesla configuration(other adapters, too).
    For the above reasons(?), the Tesla adapter pack is NOT being offered right now. Hopefully, the Tesla adapter pack WILL be offered for sale, once the technicalities are worked out?
    This thread is about the Ioniq 5. But, the same technicalities have to be worked out for all the other EV manufacturers AND their connectivity, too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2021
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  10. BillLin

    BillLin PV solar, geothermal HVAC, hybrids and electrics

    You're right that the same issues are faced by all EV adopters. The UK is a little better off with ~230V being the average outlet voltage. (double the voltage, halve the current needed for the same power level) People are free to do as they wish as long as they do it safely. If one has to run an extension cord to charge an EV parked on the street, that's not safe on many levels. If you have your charging spot at home designed or at least conceived with safety in mind, then why not do what it takes. shorter runs are better than longer runs, thicker (lower gauge) wiring is better than thinner wiring, hard wired is better than plug&socket connections, etc. And there is often the option of software configuration to make the charging rate lower than the current carrying capacity of the wiring. Manage your charging needs (e.g. recharge often) and you can make do with 110V charging. For those longer trips, charge at the many free or lower cost L2 chargers to get a head start at refilling the battery before finishing up and trickle charging at home. I spent too much time at free chargers (L2 and 50 kW L3 chargers) during my years with a first gen Leaf with CHAdeMO and then a Bolt EV with CCS. Not worth my time IMO.

    re: Tesla and legalities - I wouldn't even hazard a guess...
     
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  11. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Ha ha ha. Now that I’m retired, I got time. I’ve been looking for free L2 charging stations, with nearby walks on interesting trails to lakes, water courses & good views. Here in Washington state, I’m finding many places that I haven’t explored that DO HAVE L2 charging stations fairly close. One is a small educational aquarium within a mile of a free L2 charging station.Oh, yeah. Another small educational aquarium has a low-powered L2 charger right in its parking lot! Also, a very small cute town on one of the Salish Sea(Puget Sound) bays is nearby.
    Its funny. As my health has decreased, my interest in closer, accessible & easier places to get to, has increased. Belatedly, I love all the nearby places I’ve neglected. I will now harvest bunches of experiences that my “healthy body” never would have lowered myself to indulge, because they were “NOT worth my time”.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2021
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  12. BillLin

    BillLin PV solar, geothermal HVAC, hybrids and electrics

    Point well taken... I should have qualified that the closest free chargers are across town for me (4-5 miles) and the nearest free L3 (50 kW) is about 16 miles. Unless my errands bring me within close proximity of those chargers *and* I have loads of time available, they're not worth the effort. I have used some free L2 chargers at a distant town library (35 miles away) more than I expected. It was about a 2-minute walk to a property that my wife's one-person brokerage had as a listing, so while we had business there, I took advantage. More often than not, though, our business there was too short to grab more than 5 minutes charging at L2 speeds, so again, not worth it.

    I'm glad you're exploring nearby and finding the charging resources you seek.
     
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  13. litesong

    litesong litesong

    From August 4, 2021:
    Volta often seems to be in the doldrums, then they have a surge of growth. Before the end of August, they do have 1976 chargers installed. They’ll have to install 250 chargers per month to reach their goal of 3000 chargers before the end of 2021. Also, I think their abilities to sign up advertisers for their reader boards might be lacking.
    I think they could build their charger sites more efficiently. Two chargers(& parking spaces) should be incorporated into each of the tall advertising boards. Also, their long charging cords are getting twisted up from use & they are being laid on the ground(wet ground here in Washington state). Such things is what caused a lot of old L2 chargers to fall into disrepair. With the tall advertising boards, they could set high reels on the board sides that would allow shorter cords a lot of versatility & play-out, yet maintain neatness & ease of storage after charging.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2021
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  14. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Ha ha ha, again! If & when I get an EV AND can easily find FREE L2 charging near interesting places, my definition of “close” will not be my past definition of “close”. With free EV charging, my definition of “close” will become 2-300 miles.
    The main problem with my present EV ideas is my increasing arthritis could really start playing a role in my plans to drive such distances. I just watched a short U-tube channel in which someone ordered an EV for their planned travels, but after ordering, they died. Someone else took possession of the ordered EV.
    Anyhow, maybe the person who died, now has a definition of “close” as mega-light-years of distance.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2021
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  15. BillLin

    BillLin PV solar, geothermal HVAC, hybrids and electrics

    I think you'll have some issues with that definition of close, but whatever works for you...

    For me, close means no wasted miles getting to/from the fueling point, and I said 'fueling' intentionally. Just as most rational people won't drive out of their way to gas up just because the gas is cheaper. It is a waste of energy for no purpose. Let's say, 'penny wise and pound foolish.' From a practical sense, the one would need a much greater EV range to be able to fuel up 200 miles away and then be ready for any adventures from home.
     
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  16. litesong

    litesong litesong

    I can see why someone from Massachusetts finds notions that “200-300 miles is close”, as troublesome.
    As a life long resident & lover of western Washington, my love for eastern Washington (& other western US regions) has grown slowly & most often with my economic abilities to visit said places. Never have I been able to visit them as often as I wished. But, with the advent of efficient EVs AND the possibilities of low-priced (or free) electric charging, I now see a way to “freely” indulge my growing love for regions far from my homestead……& by visiting such areas frequently, see them not as far, but as close in my remaining Earthly times, & in my heart.
    Never have I considered travel to “far” places as wasteful(if NOT done in a gas hog) or pound foolish. Sometimes, I’ve been “penny wise”, NOT traveling when I might have been able to. I regret my “penny wise” ways (except for one period in my life), but never have I regretted my “pound foolish” ways in regards to visiting far places.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2021
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  17. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    litesong , didnt you create a special area for your doomsday reports ?
     
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  18. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi All:

    Hyundai initially indicated the Ioniq 5 would be available this fall but updated that to the winter of 2021 shortly after its reveal. Next its scheduled release was moved to the spring 2022. Now there are rumors it has been pushed back to the summer of 2022. Why? The Chip shortage may have something to do to it but I bet there is more. The LG supplied Bolt and Ioniq BEV battery recalls are probably the real reasons. Hyundai simply cannot afford to have their Reset 2.0 (Electrification) be dismantled by a recall shortly after the Ioniq 5s release to the public.

    2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

    [​IMG]

    Wayne
     
  19. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Indeed. All the EV manufacturers have awakened to the fact that 50 to 80 kWhrs of energy shuttled from the grid to battery packs, by thousands of rank amateur electricians & lessors, are dangerous operations now & even more dangerous operations in the future, when millions of rank amateurs will be dealing with unbelievable amounts of electric energy.
    Compounding the task, is the continuing public pressure on manufacturers of EVs & chargers to pump the kWhrs at ever quicker rates. I’ve earlier listed how the Ioniq 5 uses 650 to 750Volts to pump 350+ Amps into a battery pack, that under excellent conditions, has the battery pack temperatures exceeding 125 degF. This causes enough heat to make the driver(as I said, rank amateur) sitting in the Ioniq 5 uncomfortable.
    Yes, I will do my part to avoid EV fires by using only L2 chargers(not a guarantee). Thousands of rank amateurs tho, already over-work their EVs using fast-charge equipment, & given the opportunity to pump more kWhrs of energy in ever shorter time periods……. WILL pump away.
    Yeah, & the public, who pressures manufacturers for fast charge equipment, takes no responsibility for their dangerous public pressures.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2021
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  20. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Now, I report on the sibling to the Ioniq 5, the Kia EV-6 & the fairly popular U-Tube “Out of Spec” charging of the battery from 0% to 100%. Such pop reports think they perform public services by stating how batteries respond to such torture tests. This pop slop doesn’t report all data. But, the reporters think their fast talk fills in “details”, helping manufacturers to improve their products. Anyhow, the “test” ran much like the “test” Bjorn Nyland performed on Ioniq 5. Two things were noted on the Kia “test” different from the Ioniq 5 test. First, the voltage on the Kia 800Volt system at one point was OVER 800Volts! Also, NOT ever reported was the battery temperature. One item, never reported on the Ioniqs 5 or Kia EV-6 reports, since the reports had no idea: the amount of battery life degradation performing such battery charging will have on the battery packs.
    Yes, the only thing these “tests” teach is how easily EV drivers can abuse their battery packs & shorten pack life……dramatically!​
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2021

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