2016 Nissan Versa SV Fuel Mileage Update

Discussion in 'Nissan' started by Ford Man, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    Filled the Versa again today. Another tank at 50+MPG. 5 fills in a row exceeding 50MPG. Actually this was my best tank to date at 53.095MPG and there was a little bit of a/c usage on this tank lots of 40MPH driving and hot summer temperatures. Overall stats since purchase are as follows.

    Total Fuel Cost $561.81
    Total Gallons Used 261.565
    Total Miles Tracked 12502.4
    Average Fuel Cost Per Mile .0449
    Ave. MPG Since Purchase 47.798
    Gallons Saved Vs. EPA Combined Estimate 106.153
    Free Miles Vs. EPA Combined Estimate 3609.2
    Average Percent Above EPA Combined +40.584%
    Tank Percent Above EPA Combined +56.616% EPA
    Tank MPG 53.095
     
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  2. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Way to go! It’s almost like I’m driving along with you.....in your fuel sipper. Now you have the CVT transmission? Have you had it in the mountains? I had my CVT Dodge Caliber in the mountains quite often. I always loved how well the CVT picked the exact right gear ratio for every slope & curve of mountain driving. The engine was never stressed & I actually got better MPG in the mountains than my overall MPG. So many test drivers (both amateur & professional) complained about CVT performance. But I found the Caliber(not a strong or thrifty engine) capable, when driven with sense & an eye to the coming road conditions. I think the Versa would have pleased me too, while in the mountains... specially if I could have gotten, even close to the MPG you are getting while in the “flatlands”.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2020
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  3. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    I have the CVT but it hasn't been driven in the mountains since I've had it and probably never will be since I have another car we usually use for long distance driving. Our other daily driver has over 200K miles. I bought the Versa mainly to use as a little nicer car for when we went out local driving. My wife still uses the older one to drive to and from work. I've had the Versa for about 1.5 years now and the farthest it's been from home is about 100-150 miles one time. All other trips have probably been within approximately 50 miles of home. The only problem I have with the CVT is that if I have the c/c set mine increases the RPM's drastically on steeper up hill grades unless I feather feed the gas . If I take the control on steeper grades I can usually Keep my speed and keep RPM's 500-1500 lower than if I let the c/c have total control. Some hills here close to home if I let the c/c have control I'll see 3500-4000 RPM. If I feather feed the gas myself I can maintain the same speed and seldom see 2500 RPM.

    I'm really hoping this Nissan CVT will hold up as it should because, my wife is wanting to get another car for driving to and from work in the next couple years. If we can get good service from this one we may try to find her a Versa since she wants a small car that gets good mileage and the price isn't bad on them.
     
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  4. litesong

    litesong litesong

    One thing I learned from my Dodge Caliber was larger diameter tires are nicer on the highway. Larger diameter tires on our Hyundai Accent has made the small Accent highway worthy. Bet bigger tires on your Versa will make it highway worthy too.
    One feature my CVT Caliber had that you may not have on your Versa was a low setting. It was excellent for steeper hills. Yes, the rpms were higher, but not like your indicated rpms while on CC.
    Anyhow, I liked the CVT for experimenting. But now, I would recommend the manual tranny for your Versa, for long term longevity. Our manual Accent has 161,000+ miles. With the new excellent replacement clutch, it drivers better than new, & I love to drive it. The Accent should go 250,000 to 300,000 miles.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2020
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  5. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    There is a button on the side of the shifter that if I recall correctly the owners manual calls an overdrive and is probably what you're describing having on your Dodge. If by chance I ever take the car into really hilly/mountainous areas I'll see how it acts with the overdrive off. In local driving I'm usually paying enough attention to things going on with the road ahead that if I think the hill coming up is going to make the RPM's go wild I'll just slip my foot onto the gas pedal and once I get over the hill I'll let off and let the c/c take back over.

    My opinion is any car ought to last a minimum of 250-300K miles unless it's in the rust belt and is eaten up by salt. I drove an '88 Ford Escort Pony 518K miles and it was still running when I parked it a few years ago. It was using quite a bit of oil when I parked it but as long as I kept the oil level within the hash marks on the dipstick it just kept on running. Things aren't like they used to be back in the 60's and earlier when oil wasn't near as good and engines weren't built as well. As a child I remember my dad having a '61 Ford Falcon that had 77,777.7 miles on it when he pulled it on the lot to trade it off. The engine in the Falcon had already been rebuilt once and was already worn out again.
     
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  6. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Yes, I also use the CC in conjunction with observation of the terrain ahead. I think my Caliber low setting acted opposite of your “overdrive” setting. Sorry to hear Falcon engines prematurely wore out. I always figured Falcons were much better than the replacement Pintos.
     
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  7. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    Those were notoriously short-lived engines even by the standards of the day. Was it the 144in³ or 170in³? Their 200 that came a little later was better.
     
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  8. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Yeah , my mom had a Mustang with the 200. I thought it was
    pretty fast !
     
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  9. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    The '61 had a 144CI inline 6. One of my aunts had a '63 Falcon with the 170CI inline 6. I really don't know much about the 170. You're right about the 200CI being a better engine. Dad traded the '61 in on a '68 Falcon for my two older brothers to drive during their teen age years. He bought it sometime around '70 or '71 with 17K miles as I remember and it was a better engine. One of my brothers totaled it one night by running it underneath another car that was off in the ditch with the rear end sticking out in the road and he didn't see it because of oncoming headlights. After the Falcon was wrecked dad found a '66 Fairlane body and swapped the motor into it. I'd guess the little 200 went 125-150K miles and never did give any problems. I can't even remember what happened to the Fairlane in the end. I know it was never wrecked nor did the engine give up. I'm thinking dad just gave it to one of my brothers when he got married and he traded it in on a new car later on. I was the lucky one and got a '68 Mercury Montego with a 302 V8 to drive when I got my license. Those were some good engines. I drove the devil out of that car and it just kept on running. I wasn't always the the featherfooted old man I am today. Back in those days it didn't matter whether it was a car, motorcycle or what if I was driving it the first thing I wanted to know is how fast it would go and how long it took it to get there. I can't help but think how close that came to probably killing me one time and this was before I was old enough to have a license. I was riding a friends 160 Honda one Sunday afternoon and was running 80MPH with no helmet, one week later on Sunday afternoon he had a blowout on it and was only going about 30-35MPH at the time. Don't tell me God doesn't take care of idiots!! Now all I need to know is will it get me there and how much gas will it take to get me there.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2020
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  10. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Today , that "little" 200 CI engine is a big ole 3.3 liter.
    If my mental arithmetic is right.
     
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  11. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    During the '60's and '70's a 5.0 wasn't considered big. By the mid to late '70's they'd cut the HP on engines so much if you wanted anything that could get out of it's own way you needed at least a 5.0. The first car I bought for myself was a '77 Buick Regal with 5.7 and I think a whopping 140HP. Now I'm driving a 1.6 4 cylinder with 109 HP and the car weighs about 1K pounds less than the Buick.
     
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  12. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    All vehicles my parents owned before 1971 were under 5 liters---and only one or two were over 5L afterward. The first vehicle I bought for myself (not including the hand-me-down old Chevy) was a '72 Subaru with a 1267 cm³ (77.3 in³) engine. Given sufficient time (like every other car I've had--ha-ha!), it generally managed to get out of its own way. Some 1970s American cars with much larger engines and automatic transmissions made my Subaru seem zippy, especially at low speeds.
     
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  13. litesong

    litesong litesong

    In 1974 I was above 12,000 feet driving up 14,240(?) foot Mt. Evans in the Rocky Mountains, with my 65HP, 1.4 liter carbureted Subaru that I had tuned for 5000feet. Easily passed several individual big cars (I assumed with big engines) which were smoking & struggling in the mountains. Then I came up behind a 20 vehicle train of vehicles behind another smoking & struggling vehicle. But no one was passing, because a lot of the vehicles(carbureted?) were also smoking. There was half mile of clear road ahead, so away I went. Passed 20 vehicles that were choking. I even stopped my acceleration, because I didn’t want anyone pulling out in front of me, with too much speed to avoid them.
    I know this event was more about proper tuning than big-small engines. But, I got too much flack about my small engines from big engine egotists, not to gloat about my Mt. Evans trip.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2020
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  14. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Before I bought the Civic in June , I seriously considered buying a new Mitsubishi Mirage.
    The 1.2 l triple is plenty powerful ( for me ).
    But I could NOT find one. The dealer really wants you to buy one of their
    lame SUV's.
     
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  15. litesong

    litesong litesong

    I wanted a Ford Fiesta 1.0 liter triple. I loved the smartness & work Ford put into it to smooth the inherently non-smooth triple. But, I didn’t want the bad automatic tranny that came with it, just the 5spd manual. It had a backseat that was too small & other problems too. That’s why we ended up with an Hyundai Accent & two Elantras.
     
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  16. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Been 3 weeks since last filling. On a scenic tour, tanked up 23.6 gallons for the Accent on cheap gas (for Washington state), plus filled gas cans for the 2 Elantras.
     
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  17. litesong

    litesong litesong

    My calculator shows that 200 CI engine is 3277.4128 Liter....or 3.3 liter to 2 decimal places. You’re a brainiac & an erudite person. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2020
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  18. jcp123

    jcp123 Caliente!

    Gotta say that I’m a bit envious. My ol Civic mostly just musters mid-40s, though I don’t work the techniques as hard and it’s almost all freeway miles. Still, I bet I could wrestle 50+ with a couple of my old commutes.

    Took well over a decade, but they have nailed efficiency really well.
     
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  19. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    I've been having to drive the Versa a little more the last couple weeks because the daily driver (2002 Escort) for my wife going to/from work has been down and it's just been too darn hot/humid to work on it. Anyway I filled the Versa again yesterday 513.8 miles on 9.654 gallons for 53.221 MPG. This is the second time in as many tanks that I've got a new personal best MPG on this car. This tank also had probably around 10 trips to/from the gym where I do water therapy for chronic back pain. These trips are only about 1.5 miles each way. There was also a small amount of a/c use on days when the temperatures were unbearable or it was raining. The Versa loves 40MPH driving and hot/humid weather. The weather was cool enough one day this week to work on the '02 so it's back on the road. The Versa can rest a lot more now and be used more for the purpose it was bought for, a little nicer car to drive when going out and not as a daily commuter.

    @jcp123, I'll bet you could get well over 50 MPG in the Civic with some techniques such as lower speed and decreased a/c usage. I used to drive an '88 Ford Escort Pony that would consistently get 40-43 MPG in local driving or 70-90 MPH highway driving but if I'd slow down to 50-55 MPH on the highway I could sometimes get 50-55 MPG with what is now 30+ year old throttle body injection technology and a 1.9L 4 speed manual tranny. I know sometimes it just not feasible to drive slower but with me being disabled I'm not usually in any hurry. Also with the corona virus going on and us not getting out a lot I've been driving slower just to keep us out a little longer instead of just sitting at home all the time. Back when I drove the above speeds I was still working construction. Lots of times I'd be working 10-12+ hr. days and usually driving 50-125 miles a day to/from work with city driving in the larger cities in NC. If I didn't drive faster just commuting and working could easily turn into 15-16 hr. days. That didn't leave much time for anything else except for eating and sleeping. As it was during the winter it wasn't uncommon to leave home well before daylight and not get back until after dark.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
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  20. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    My wife is wanting a different work commuter in the next couple years and we too had thought about a Fiesta or Focus but, like you I'm a little leary of the tranny's in them and she can't drive a manual. If the CVT holds up well in this Versa we may look for her a Versa as a daily driver. Again I'd be looking for something low mileage probably with a rebuilt title so we could get a decent car and keep cost to a minimum.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
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