2019 Kia Niro EV - 239-mile All-Electric Range BEV

Discussion in 'In the News' started by xcel, Dec 1, 2018.

  1. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    [​IMG] Pricing and release date this spring.

    Wayne Gerdes – CleanMPG – November, 2018

    2019 Kia Niro EV

    [​IMG]

    The Guinness World Records holding Kia Niro Hybrid is going to soon be receiving a sibling in the form of a 239-mile range, 100 percent battery electric.

    The Niro EV arrives with a liquid-cooled 64kWh Li-Ion polymer battery packaged under the floor with minimal passenger space intrusion.

    The Niro EV includes 100 kW CCS DC Fast Charging capability standard which allows the new battery electric to go from flat to 80 percent in just 60-minutes (~ 190-mile range) on a 100 kW charger and 1-hour and 15-minutes on 50 kW charger. From a std. 240V Level 2 at 7.2 kWh, the Niro can go from flat to full in ~ 9.5 hours.

    On the propulsion front, the Niro EV includes a 201-hp and 291 lb.-ft. of torque electric motor with a 0 to 60 time of just under 8-seconds.

    The Niro EV is equipped with the following drive modes:

    Eco, Normal, Sport, and Eco+ that automatically adjust regenerative braking level, HVAC.

    Drivers can also choose from four regen braking levels (0 to 3). Use the minimum with your brake pedal for best efficiency of course.

    The Brake and Hold System feature allows regen paddle shifter to bring the car to a full stop simulating a one-pedal driving experience. Again, forget that.

    When Kia designed and created the Niro, it was engineered to accommodate many different electrified powertrains. First to arrive in 2016 was the hybrid, then in 2017 the Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV), and now a fully-electric powertrain.

    2019 Kia Niro BEV/HEV Passenger and Cargo Volume Comparison

    Cargo Cap w/ rear seats upright (cu.ft): 18.5/19.4
    Cargo Cap w/ rear seats seats folded (cu.ft): 53.0/54.5
    Passenger Cap (cu.ft): 96.6/100.9

    2019 Kia Niro EV Rear Hatch

    [​IMG]

    2019 Kia Niro EV Exterior Features
    • Unique front fascia with closed off grille
    • “Arrowhead” LED Daytime Running Lights (DRLs)
    • New lower air intake with EcoDynamics blue surround accent
    • Specially-designed 17” alloys to reduce drag and improve efficiency
    • Reshaped rocker panels
    • Revised front and rear bumper fascias with blue trim accents
    2019 Kia Niro EV Interior Features
    • Rotary shifter dial
    • Customizable “mood” lighting
    • Large center console with cup holders, storage compartments and 3 USB ports – 2 charging and one connectivity
    • Niro EV-only seat upholstery with blue highlights
    • Available blue and black “holographic” graphic door trim
    The Niro EV includes the “Kia Drive Wise” suite of Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems, and a long list of standard and optional equipment.
    • 7” color touchscreen with rear view camera and parking guidance
    • 6-speaker audio system (AM/FM/SiriusXM8) with USB input
    • Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
    • Standard Qi wireless smart phone charging
    • Bluetooth wireless connectivity with voice recognition
    • 7 airbags (dual front, side, and side curtain and driver's knee air bags)
    Vehicle Safety Systems include ABS, TC, ESC, HAS, real time wheel pressure readout TPMS plus Forward Collision Warning (FCW), Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist (FCA), Lane Departure Warning (LDW), Lane Keeping Assist (LKA), Blind Spot Collision Warning (BSW), Driver Attention Warning (DAW), Smart Cruise Control with Stop & Go, Rear Cross-Traffic Alert, and Parking Distance Warning - Forward and Reverse (available).

    2019 Kia Niro BEV Infotainment

    New for Niro EV is a revamped UVO infotainment system that allows owners to monitor and control a long list of vehicle operations, including Notifications of battery and charging status, Real-time charging station update, setup Scheduled charging, Panic notifications, “Send-to-Car” points of interest (POI) and waypoints, and Pre-condition the vehicle cabin temperature prior to use.

    2019 Kia Niro BEV Battery

    Hyundai/Kia sources EV, HEV, and PHEV batteries from multiple global suppliers. The battery specifications and exact cell chemistry varies for each application, which can impact materials and sourcing. Globally, battery manufacturers including LG Chem and SK innovation, source battery elements, including cobalt, from a variety of regions. These battery manufacturers regularly review mineral sourcing, and re-source to new areas to manage stability, cost, logistics, and other factors, ultimately looking at other ways to source cobalt and to reduce usage. Engineers are striving to progressively reduce the volume of cobalt required.

    Like the Niro Hybrid and Plug-in Hybrid, the Niro EV will be built in South Korea at Kia’s Hwaseong manufacturing facility. Pricing will be announced when it goes on sale early next year. The Niro EV will be available in an EX and EX Premium trim.

    Premium EX features include:
    • 8” NAVI touchscreen
    • Power tilt/slide sunroof
    • LED headlamps
    • 8-speaker Harman/Kardon20 premium audio system with external amplifier and subwoofer
    • Auto-dimming mirror with Homelink
    • Heated steering wheel
    • LED interior lighting
    • Mood lighting
    • Parking distance warning – forward and reverse
    • Deluxe scuff plate
    WOW! Anything more need to be said? ;)
     
    BillLin likes this.
  2. Does it have level 1, 120 volt charging?
     
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  3. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi James:

    Yes it does. 59 hours from Flat to full on a Level1.

    Wayne
     
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  4. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    Pricing and battery warranty details would be my two big questions. (GM says the Bolt's battery degradation of 40% is normal :eek:).

    Hyundai EVs are looking darn efficient, hopefully Kia's are as well.
     
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  5. NeilBlanchard

    NeilBlanchard Well-Known Member

    Where does GM say that?
     
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  6. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    Bolt EV owner's manual, p. 322.

    "Like all batteries, the amount of energy that the high voltage“propulsion” battery can store will decrease with time and miles driven. Depending on use, the battery may degrade as little as 10% to as much as 40% of capacity over the warranty period."
    https://my.chevrolet.com/content/dam/gmownercenter/gmna/dynamic/manuals/2017/Chevrolet/BOLT EV/Owner's Manual.pdf

    Right there in black and white pdf --- you can bet lattes to 'lectrons that GM will point this out if you complain about range loss in your warranty period.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2018
  7. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    My understanding of EVs (maybe somebody here knows better)---

    Once you hit around 70% of battery capacity left -- there will be issues with the car. Power (acceleration) loss, unexpected shutdowns, inaccurate range readings, go out to your car on a cold morning when you 'know' there's some charge left -- but it won't power up and move. Basically your "rubber bucket" of electrons has become a lot smaller and more rubbery -- increased subjection to problems with voltage sag under load.

    This 40% rule probably protects GM from most all degradation warranty costs, as the car would be in serious need of battery replacement before you get all the way down to the 60% remaining. So in frustration you pay for a new/refurbed battery pack out of pocket, or trade the car in.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2018
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  8. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    But how much are Bolts actually losing? IIRC, Teslas are losing less than predicted, or supposed, by the company.
     
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  9. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    I don't know. What I would really like to know is how are all those Model S's doing. There was a very nice googledoc that was being participated by the owners. That got shut down due to some sort of "hack" ... supposedly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2018 at 5:03 AM
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  10. NeilBlanchard

    NeilBlanchard Well-Known Member

    I am not aware of ANY complaints of lost battery capacity on a Bolt EV. The may be some, of course, but with the Leaf we heard about it a lot. The Bolt EV has both active cooling and heating, while the Leaf only has active heating.
     
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  11. NeilBlanchard

    NeilBlanchard Well-Known Member

    A very useful review of the Kia e-Niro:

     
    xcel likes this.
  12. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    With proper cooling and charge management, I would not expect cycle life to be the primary concern with the Bolt (or Tesla). I expect a well managed/maintained and frequently utilized bolt may see 150,000+ miles of cycle life.

    The problem nobody talks about is calendar life.

    My understanding (current battery technology) is that even under ideal storage conditions (low temp, 40% or so SOC) , .. a lithium cobalt battery will lose about 2% capacity per year. Store it at a high state of charge and in a hot garage and you could be looking at a 5% annual loss or more.
    Internal resistance will also rise as the years pile on.

    Conditions are rarely ideal, ... so I expect the Teslas and other Lithium cobalt EV batteries to start failing around the 8 to 12 year point, .. as much due to calendar aging as anything else.

    Now can (has) the battery chemistry improved? Are the latest batch of batteries good for 20 years? --- maybe, ... I guess we just have to wait and see ... But without a very solid (and detailed) battery warranty (or a lease), ... you get to wait and see from the edge of your car seat.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018 at 3:51 PM
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  13. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    I'd imagine that none of the Bolts on the road have any noticeable degradation YET. But this is a big
    concern. There are gasoline ( and diesel ) cars that are 20 years old and still get (close to) the same
    fuel economy as new. Okay , let's have a show of hands : who would buy a 12-year-old Bolt or Tesla
    with the original battery ? Also , who would replace the battery on these cars after 12 years and THEN sell it ?
    I'm curious.
     
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  14. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    You can't look at the battery in isolation for the ICE comparison.
    How much was spent on oil and transmission fluid changes for that twenty year old car? A quick calculation for a car driven 15k miles a year has that at over $2000 for just basic fluid maintenance, and such a car likely required some repair work at one point. Plus there is the increased cost the ICE car will have for brakes.
     
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  15. SI_Prius

    SI_Prius Well-Known Member

    I would say more like 12-15 years, we will see who was more right in couple of years :D
     
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