Found a good source for discounted Toyota OEM parts

Discussion in 'Toyota' started by ALS, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 2010 Prius (CAN Touring) Staff Member

    That's not good!

    Just grasping at straws: what tire pressures are you running?
     
  2. ALS

    ALS Super Moderator Staff Member

    42 front 40 rear.
     
  3. brick

    brick Answers to "that guy."

    Strange. Hubs are usually pretty robust. I think I've lost one in 16-ish years of driving? At least the assemblies aren't all that difficult to replace. I had both rear hubs off of my wife's Prius at one point to install EZ-Shims and it wasn't such a bad job.
     
  4. jcp123

    jcp123 Caliente!

    I'll keep these sites in mind. If/when I ever move to an emissions county/state, I'll order an OEM cat and both O2 sensors. Might think about a front bumper, upper grille, and lower engine cover as all the mounting points are shot and the latter missing altogether. And the little plastic top engine cover, as it is missing as well and I hate having to deal with rainwater infiltrating my spark plug tubes.

    Bummer about all those wheel bearing/hub issues. Must have been designed for smooth Japanese roads :p
     
  5. ALS

    ALS Super Moderator Staff Member

    Don't forget about car-part.com also. Salvage yards can be a life saver on the wallet. I just picked up a hub cap for $25. They go for $50 something online, $83 at the dealer.
     
  6. jcp123

    jcp123 Caliente!

    Ooh another good one. Thanky!
     
  7. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    Evidently that's a very common issue on Prii, from what I've seen on PriusChat. Wheel bearings used to cost a lot less, and last much longer, usually.
     
  8. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 2010 Prius (CAN Touring) Staff Member

    I read somewhere, fwiw: the bearing design is better for rolling resistance, but longevity suffers. Wouldn't hurt to stay closer to spec'd tire pressures too I think: stiffer tires transmit more shocks through to the bearing.
     
  9. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Ooh , that's a tough decision for me. I'm running around 47/45 right now , the OEM Yokahoma tires are 44 max. I don't want to run any LESS , but I don't want to replace hub/bearings prematurely.
     
  10. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 2010 Prius (CAN Touring) Staff Member

    Have you tried lower pressures lately? I've been dropping pressures, and wasn't see an appreciable difference, so I kept them lower, still 2~4 pounds above the door jamb decal, but closer at least. Our Prius has the low profile 17" tires though, ride is harsher at any pressure.
     
  11. ALS

    ALS Super Moderator Staff Member

    I used to run them at 44F-42R and I dropped them to 42F-40R.
     
  12. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Hmmmmm........... I could try that , but I want to run one more tank with the current pressures. Then I can try 42/40.
     
  13. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    True, but the effect would be so trivial that it's kinda grasping at straws. Banishing unneeded weight from the car might help just as much (along with other beneficial effects).

    Has anyone done autopsies to determine the real cause of these failures? If they're typically caused by water or dirt intrusion through inadequate seals, or by inadequate grease, or by excessively tight preloading, then changing tire pressures or weight won't help. The only wheel bearing failures on any car I've had (or any family member has had in the last few decades) were caused by water intrusion.
     
    Mendel Leisk and BillLin like this.
  14. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    It wouldn't be the first time an automaker bean-counter has cut corners a bit too much. Wonder how much Toyota saved on this one. I may be glad I purchased an extended warranty. Time to read the fine print.
     
  15. carid

    carid New Member

    Alternatively you can find some OE quality aftermarket repair parts here: http://www.carid.com/toyota-parts/
    It's always a big concern if dealer's parts are priced properly and if aftermarket analogs are reliable enough. In most cases I would lean towards genuine OEM parts, but such things as rubber gaskets, extension wires or even body panels that don't really have to play a serious function can be purchased from an aftermarket supplier. There are many quality grades like OE+, OE, etc.
     
  16. phoebeisis

    phoebeisis Well-Known Member

    Hmmm
    Betting less than 1% difference in MPG 45 VS 37-
    gas is cheap-bearings-pricy to replace-and DIY safe bet-no fun
    Of course hard to believe much more wear to a bearing 45 vs 37 psi-
    lots of pickups run 80 psi with stiff as heck tires and heavy as heck loads
    bearings shouldn't be able to "tell" 45psi from 37psi-and not as if Toyota is experienced in specifying wheel bearings-
    if they aren't defective-they probably outlast the first owner-99% of the time
    My 1986 Toyota truck had extremely STIFF shocks-rode like a buckboard- 11 years 120,000 pothole city miles-no wheel bearings-
    it and everything(me) in that truck took an awful pounding(I carried 400 lbs of water in the bed to ease the ride-50 1 gallon water jugs-tied in)
    So Toyota must know how to specify wheel bearings(roughly the same size tires I think-truck might have been 14"-maybe 185/75 14 or so-tiny)

    Charlie
     
  17. jcp123

    jcp123 Caliente!

    I used to have a neighbor with a Prius across the street. Looked like he was always tweaking the rear drums, now I wonder if maybe he wasn't messing with wheel bearings...?
     
  18. ALS

    ALS Super Moderator Staff Member

    The general consensus over on Prius Chat is the seals are the problem. With the replacement units it is believed that the issue has been fixed.
     
    BillLin likes this.

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