Nissan-Sentra: Close to hypermiling

Discussion in 'Nissan' started by tbaleno, Feb 24, 2006.

  1. SentraSE-R

    SentraSE-R Pishtaco

    I've kept a mileage log since last Spring, for more than 7400 miles, and I'm averaging over 37 mpg. If I can do that with the thirsty 170 hp 2.5 liter engine, you folks with the 1.8 and 2.0 L engines should easily top that ;).
     
  2. kingcommute

    kingcommute Hypermiling Apprentice

    I'm hoping so...we'll see what the AT allows. If this car just had an MT - I could think of absolutely nothing wrong with it. I'll be filling up tomorrow so we'll see what the verdict is.
     
  3. kingcommute

    kingcommute Hypermiling Apprentice

    And by the way - nice job on the numbers you are pulling out of a car specifically designed to be less efficient than its brethren with the smaller motors. Kudos!
     
  4. SentraSE-R

    SentraSE-R Pishtaco

    In the last three months, since I started hypermiling, I'm averaging over 40 mpg ;).
     
  5. kingcommute

    kingcommute Hypermiling Apprentice

    I just filled up yesterday in the 01 Sentra AT. Averaged 37mpg over 398 miles. Not bad - but I know some things that could have gone better. 40 is within my reach, especially with warmer weather coming.
     
  6. SentraSE-R

    SentraSE-R Pishtaco

    The difference between AT and MT! 37 mpg isn't bad for an AT. I only get 38.6 out of my wife's AT auto, on strictly highway drives. If you can squeeze 40 mpg out of yours, you'll be doing well. Try keeping the AT under 2000 rpm while accelerating, and force it to upshift into overdrive lockup early (about 42 mph). That should yield your best mpg.
     
  7. kingcommute

    kingcommute Hypermiling Apprentice

    The car needs some things too that should help with economy - if only a little. It needs an oil change, transmission fluid change, and probably needs new spark plugs. With those things and the warmer weather + summer gas I should be able to hit 40 - or at least I hope so. I really like the car though. It is quite solid given what its been through. Planning on working on it this weekend - so hopefully next week will yield higher numbers.
     
  8. Ratnose86

    Ratnose86 Well-Known Member

    I used to have your exact car brand new but wrecked it. Black with the red and black interior I'm guessing? I loved that car, so jealous. I didn't realize it could get such great FE.

    Now I have a 1997 Sentra GXE with an auto and 40mpg is my goal this summer. Also a 500 mile tank is a goal.
     
  9. SentraSE-R

    SentraSE-R Pishtaco

    I don't play the longest mileage tank game. It's too hard to restart a dry fuel injected system. But if I P&G my car, I can get about 43 mpg. Taking a fairly conservative 41 mpg, and figuring I'll leave .7 gallons for insurance in my 13.2 mpg gas tank, I should be able to squeeze a 512.5 tank out of my SE-R.

    I have the silver paint job, with the red/black seat colors.
     
  10. Right Lane Cruiser

    Right Lane Cruiser Penguin of Notagascar

    Darrell, you can just carry a gallon or so with you when you know you're getting close. When the car starts hesitating, just pull over and dump your extra in (after recording all the relevant info first, of course!). You have to do some calculating after fillup to take into account the amount you added and then subsequently burned to get to a gas station, but it isn't that bad.

    I did that for my Insight (as it ran out just before work -- nowhere close to a gas station). I had a can ready in my Elantra but she lost all power (wouldn't do more than idle RPM :eek:) just as I was passing a station so I pulled a U-turn and coasted up to a pump. ;)

    Neither vehicle needed to be primed and neither actually stopped the engine from lack of fuel. I had a few miles worth of warning in both due to loss of acceleration power.
     
  11. aaronl

    aaronl Alternative transportation advocate

    Probably a stupid question, but if you let a vehicle run out of fuel, wouldn't it be running very lean as the amount of fuel that reaches the cylinders drops off? Could that cause damage to the engine or emissions equipment?

    I've also heard that some fuel pumps can be damaged by running the tank dry as they're lubricated with gasoline.
     
  12. Right Lane Cruiser

    Right Lane Cruiser Penguin of Notagascar

    As for leaning out, no -- the ECU maintains the air to fuel ratio. What I experienced was a severe drop off in fuel pressure. This is why the ECU wouldn't let the engine go past idle in the Elantra. I had just bump started and when I pushed the accelerator the engine just kept idling! :eek:

    The Insight acted just a little different because it does actively lean out the mixture under certain conditions. I had to pull over before getting to work because the car ran fine until I loaded it more. That would pull it out of lean burn and then it started to stumble. Because of this I couldn't make it over the last hill (less than a half mile from my work :p) and had to dump the extra fuel in.

    In neither case did I actually run completely dry -- if I had there would have been no fuel pressure at all and the engine wouldn't have run.
     
  13. aaronl

    aaronl Alternative transportation advocate

    Are these throttle by wire vehicles? Otherwise how can the ECU maintain the correct mixture except by supplying more fuel?
     

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